Review: An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

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Title: An Enchantment of Ravens
Author: Margaret Rogerson
Series: Standalone
Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry Books
Publication Date: September 26, 2017
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Source: Purchased

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Rating: 2 stars

A skilled painter must stand up to the ancient power of the faerie courts—even as she falls in love with a faerie prince—in this gorgeous debut novel.

Isobel is a prodigy portrait artist with a dangerous set of clients: the sinister fair folk, immortal creatures who cannot bake bread, weave cloth, or put a pen to paper without crumbling to dust. They crave human Craft with a terrible thirst, and Isobel’s paintings are highly prized. But when she receives her first royal patron—Rook, the autumn prince—she makes a terrible mistake. She paints mortal sorrow in his eyes—a weakness that could cost him his life.

Furious and devastated, Rook spirits her away to the autumnlands to stand trial for her crime. Waylaid by the Wild Hunt’s ghostly hounds, the tainted influence of the Alder King, and hideous monsters risen from barrow mounds, Isobel and Rook depend on one another for survival. Their alliance blossoms into trust, then love—and that love violates the fair folks’ ruthless laws. Now both of their lives are forfeit, unless Isobel can use her skill as an artist to fight the fairy courts. Because secretly, her Craft represents a threat the fair folk have never faced in all the millennia of their unchanging lives: for the first time, her portraits have the power to make them feel.

Review:

No one is more disappointed than me to be writing this review right now. Since early last year I was looking forward to picking up An Enchantement of Ravens. The cover is easily one of the most gorgeous covers ever (duh, Charlie Bowater is an artistic goddess) and the synopsis had me hooked. I was the smallest bit apprehensive because it’s a fantasy standalone and short as heck, but I had faith I would love it anyway. Unfortunately, no. I did not like this at all.

My biggest issue was how under developed the characters and the romance was. Everything was skimmed over, which essentially made the romance an insta-love that made zero sense. I mean, when Rook’s painting was completed and Isobel was missing him, she realized she was in love with him. I’d love to know when on earth that happened. They exchanged looks a few times and she moved his head once to get him at a better angle where there was a physical connection between them. How does that constitute falling in love? What did I miss? For god’s sake, I’ve had a bigger connection with any person I’ve randomly bumped into on a squished rush hour bus than those two had.

Not only that, but I have so many questions about every single character. Everyone was brushed over in the simplest way and we got to know no one. There were so many opportunities to enrich the story with the backstories of the characters and how they tie into the novel itself. But we didn’t get any of that.

If this was any other book, I would have fallen in love with the main male character. Not this time though because we knew nothing about him. Sure, he felt sorrow and we got a sentence as to why. But a sentence isn’t satisfying. I want his backstory. He’s lived for lord knows how many years, surely lots of things have happened in his life.

Another thing that disappointed me was that I was not at all expecting this to be a journey/travel type of novel. Most times I don’t enjoy those and this case was no different especially because everything was skimmed over so quickly.

Last thing, and the thing that probably frustrated me most, was the ending. Of course I’m not going to go into detail because I don’t want to spoil anything for the people out there who were in my position a year ago and want to read this. BUT OH MY GOD. I AM ANNOYED. SO. SO. ANNOYED.

Overall, this was a novel with so much potential but fell completely flat for me. The opportunity to make this a novel full of fae backstory, romance, and court politics was there. We just didn’t get any of it. It left me bored and not caring about the story or the characters.

About Margaret Rogerson:

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Margaret writes fantasy for young adult readers. She lives near Cincinnati, Ohio, and when she’s not reading or writing she enjoys drawing, watching documentaries, making pudding, gaming, and exploring the outdoors in search of toads and mushrooms.

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One thought on “Review: An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

  1. dinipandareads says:

    OH NO. I loved Sorcery of Thorns and so I was really excited to pick this up. Just like you said, the premise sounds so interesting and the cover artwork is gorgeous! But I totally understand your frustration with underdeveloped characters. That’s one of my peeves as well! I think I’ll still read this but I guess I will lower my expectations? 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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